Michigan became the first state to pass comprehensive statewide self-driving car regulations in the U.S. The laws establish regulations for the testing, use and eventual commercial sale of self-driving cars.

Up until now, automated vehicles were banned in the state of Michigan. Now, that will no longer be the case. Four bills that were first introduced to the state Senate in May were signed into effect by the governor last Friday, December 9.

The bills legalize self-driving cars, ridesharing, testing and their use on public roads. Testing is also allowed for automated cars that are without a steering wheel, brake pedal or human in the front seat. These bills amend the Michigan Motor Vehicle requirements and the law that previously prohibited automated vehicles. Additionally, they make liability concerns a bit more clear. Automakers operating a ride-hail network must take full liability for the accidents when the vehicle is driving and found at fault.

Motor vehicle manufacturers will also be allowed to test and deploy on-demand networks of autonomous cars. Nontraditional auto manufacturers like Google and Apple or automated car startups will have to gain special permission or work with car manufacturers before testing self-driving car networks.

It’s no surprise that Michigan is looking to lead self-driving car legislation as the state is also developing the American Center for Mobility, a testing site for research and development of automated vehicles.

Read more about the laws on Business Insider.

Source: Recode / Photo credit: Dllu