Cheap Car Insurance in Ohio 2019

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Finding cheap Ohio car insurance

Looking for cheap auto insurance in Ohio? Here are some of the best ways to find savings:

  • Shop around and compare several car insurance quotes. Auto insurance rates can vary by hundreds of dollars among insurers for the same kind of coverage, so shopping around can pay off.
  • Keep a good driving record and avoid insurance claims. Accidents, tickets and claims can all result in a rate increase at renewal time.
  • Ask your auto insurance agent to review all the discounts from your insurer to make sure you're getting all possible savings.
  • Adding a young driver to your insurance? We have tips for getting cheap car insurance for teen drivers.
  • Raise the deductible on comprehensive and collision insurance, if you buy them.
  • Buy homeowners insurance from your car insurance company to get a "bundling" discount.

We analyzed average insurance premiums reported by EverQuote users in Ohio so you can see how prices compare.

Sections:

Ohio insurance vs. the U.S. average
Average Ohio insurance premiums by company
Insurance increases after a speeding ticket
Insurance increases after an accident
Average premiums for Ohio cities

Ohio insurance vs. the U.S. average

Ohio is among the best states for low auto insurance premiums. The state ranks No. 11 in our analysis of prices for full coverage car insurance.

  • $1,496/year Ohio average.
  • $1,684/year national average.

Average Ohio premiums by company

Company
Click to see reviews

Average annual premium in Ohio

Erie Insurance

$1,284

Travelers Insurance

$1,308

The Hartford

$1,335

Grange

$1,372

State Farm

$1,404

Geico

$1,457

Auto-Owners Insurance

$1,457

Nationwide Insurance

$1,459

21st Century Insurance

$1,492

Farmers Insurance

$1,498

American Family Insurance

$1,503

AAA Insurance/Auto Club

$1,522

Allstate

$1,529

USAA (must have a military affiliation to apply)

$1,535

Progressive Insurance

$1,567

Liberty Mutual

$1,567

Safeco

$1,609

Esurance

$1,614

The General

$1,714

MetLife

$1,830

Allied

$1,892

Insurance increases in Ohio after a speeding ticket

Ohio drivers who get a speeding ticket pay an average insurance increase of 27%, about the same as the nationwide average increase.

State Annual premium with clean driving record Annual premium with speeding ticket % increase
Ohio $1,496 $1,901 27%
Nationwide average 26%

Insurance increases in Ohio after an accident

Ohio drivers who cause an accident get an average insurance increase of 41%, higher than the national average increase.

State Annual premium with clean driving record Annual premium with a chargeable accident, no injury % increase
Ohio $1,496 $2,081 39%
Nationwide average 36%

Average insurance paid in Ohio cities

Car owners in Youngstown are paying the most for auto insurance among the Ohio cities we examined.

City

Average annual premium

Akron

$1,534

Canton

$1,487

Cincinnati

$1,593

Cleveland

$1,531

Columbus

$1,580

Dayton

$1,461

Euclid

$1,585

Hamilton

$1,581

Mansfield

$1,391

Springfield

$1,404

Toledo

$1,602

Warren

$1,424

Youngstown

$1,623

Minimum car insurance in Ohio

Ohio requires only one type of insurance to legally drive: Liability insurance. But people often need more than the state-required minimum auto insurance. The minimums may not be enough if you cause an accident. And liability insurance doesn't pay for any damage to your own car. Let's take a look at the Ohio insurance options so you can choose what's right for you.

Ohio minimum liability insurance:

Liability insurance is essential coverage. It pays for damage and injuries you cause others. You can be sued if your insurance doesn't cover all the damage or medical bills of others. That's why it's often wise to buy more than the state minimum auto insurance. In Ohio you must have coverage limits for at least:

  • $25,000 bodily injury per person.
  • $50,000 bodily injury per accident.
  • $25,000 property damage per accident.

This is written as 25/50/25.


Uninsured motorist (UM) and underinsured motorist (UIM) coverage:

UM and UIM are not required in Ohio. These coverage types pay for your injuries caused by a driver who has no liability insurance or not enough. Here's what to know:

  • You can't buy UM coverage limits that are higer than your liability limits. For example, if your liability limits are 25/50, you can't buy more UM than 25/50.
  • In Ohio you can also buy a form of UM called uninsured motorist property damage (UMPD) coverage. This pays for your car damage from an uninsured driver. But if you have collision coverage you don't need UMPD.
  • The lowest UMPD limit you can buy in Ohio is $7,500.
  • UMPD can also cover damage from a hit-and-run driver, but in Ohio you need independent corroboration (like a witness) of the hit and run.

   More: Cheap car insurance in Ohio

Collision and comprehensive coverage: These cover damage to your own car. Liability insurance required by the state does not. Collision and comprehensive coverage will pay for damage from problems such as hitting an animal, hail, flood, fire, vandalism, falling objects and explosions.

Comprehensive insurance also covers the theft of your vehicle if it's stolen and not recovered. The maximum insurance payout for a theft claim is the value of your vehicle minus the deductible you chose.

If you have a car loan or lease, you're probably required to have comprehensive and collision coverage by the lender or leasing company.

Rental reimbursement: If your vehicle is in the shop due to an accident, this pays for a rental car.

Medical payments (MedPay) coverage pays for injuries to you and your passengers no matter who caused the accident. It is not required in Ohio. 

You must show an insurance ID card (or other proof of financial responsibility) when:

  • Law enforcement requests it.
  • You renew vehicle registration.

Penalties for not having car insurance in Ohio

  • First offense: impoundment of license and Class F suspension of the person's license or permit. A Class F suspension is lifted when you meet the conditions of financial responsibility.
  • Subsequent offenses within five years of the violation: your vehicle is impounded and operating privileges are again suspended. Impoundment of license and Class C suspension of license for one year.
  • If, within five years, your license is impounded two or more times and operating privileges are suspended: Class B suspension of license or permit for two years.

Source: Property Casualty Insurers Association of America

Consumer complaints against auto insurance companies

Each state's department of insurance handles and tracks complaints against insurance companies that operate in the state. Shown below are national complaint ratios for the largest auto insurance companies in Ohio. The ratios show complaints relative to a company's size.

Ohio auto insurance complaints comparison

Operating a Vehicle Under the Influence of Alcohol and/or Drugs (OVI) laws in Ohio

First offense

The first OVI offense is a first-degree misdemeanor in Ohio. If you are convicted of an OVI and you have a low BAC (between .08 and .17) or were under the influence of drugs, you may get:

  • A $375 to $1,075 fine.
  • Three days in jail or Driver Intervention Program, up to six months.
  • License suspension for one to three years; may be reduced to half if you take an Underage Drinking Program; the court may grant driving privileges after 15 days.
  • The court may impose a restricted plate if it grants you limited driving privileges.
  • If the court grants unlimited driving privileges, you will be required to install an ignition interlock.

If your BAC is high for your first OVI offense (equal or greater to .17) or if you have refused a chemical test within the past 20 years, you may face:

  • A $375 to $1,075 fine.
  • Six days in jail or three days in jail and up to six months in a Driver Intervention Program.
  • License suspension for one to three years; may be reduced to half with an Underage Drinking Program; the court may grant driving privileges after 15 days.
  • Restricted plates are required for limited driving privileges.
  • If the court grants unlimited driving privileges, you will be required to install an ignition interlock.

Second offense

The second offense is a first-degree misdemeanor in Ohio. If you are convicted of a second OVI in 10 years and you have a low BAC test or were under the influence of drugs, you may face:

  • A $525 to $1,625 fine.
  • 10 days in jail or five days in jail and 18 days house arrest and/or Continuous Alcohol Monitoring for up to six months.
  • Mandatory alcohol/drug assessment and recommended treatment.
  • License suspension between one to seven years; the court may grant driving privileges after 45 days.
  • Restricted driving plates are optional.
  • If the offense is alcohol related, an ignition interlock is required; optional if drug related.

If your BAC is high for your first OVI offense (equal or greater to .17) or if you have refused a chemical test within the past 20 years, you may face:

  • A $525 to $1,625 fine.
  • 20 days in jail or 10 days in jail with 36 days of house arrest and/or Continuous Alcohol Monitoring (up to six months).
  • Mandatory alcohol/drug assessment and recommended treatment.
  • Restricted plates for high-test is mandatory; optional if for chemical test refusal.
  • If the driving offense is alcohol related, an ignition interlock is required; optional if drug related.
  • Your vehicle may be immobilized for 90 days.

Third offense

The third offense in 10 years is an unclassified misdemeanor. If you are convicted and have a low BAC test (between .08 and .17) or were under the influence of drugs, you may face:

  • An $850 to $2,750 fine.
  • 30 days in jail or 15 days jail and 55 days house arrest and/or Continuous Alcohol Monitoring (up to one year).
  • Mandatory alcohol/drug addiction program.
  • License suspension two to 12 years (minimum may be reduced to one year), court may grant driving privileges after 180 days.
  • Restricted driving plate is required.
  • If the driving offense is alcohol related, an ignition interlock is required; optional if drug related.
  • You may have to forfeit your vehicle.

If your BAC is high for your first OVI offense (equal or greater to .17) or if you have refused a chemical test within the past 20 years, you may face:

  • An $850 to $2,750 fine.
  • 60 days in jail or 30 days in jail and 110 days of house arrest and/or Continuous Alcohol Monitoring (up to one year).
  • Mandatory alcohol/drug addiction program.
  • License suspension for two to 12 years (minimum may be reduced to one year); court may grant driving privileges after 180 days.
  • Restricted driving plates required.
  • If the driving offense is alcohol related, an ignition interlock is required; optional if drug related.
  • You may have to forfeit your vehicle.

Subsequent offenses

If you are convicted of a fourth and fifth OVI offense within 10 years, it is a fourth-degree felony in Ohio. Sixth and subsequent offenses within 20 years are fourth-degree felonies. If you have plead guilty of an OVI felony in the past, no matter when it took place, the violation is a third-degree felony.

If convicted of subsequent offenses, the potential penalties and fines are more severe, including:

  • Up to $10,500 in fines.
  • Up to five years in prison.
  • Lifetime license suspension.

OVI penalty source: Judge Jennifer P. Weiler of the Garfield Heights Municipal Courts and the National Conference of State Legislatures

Distracted driving laws in Ohio

Prohibits drivers from using hand-held cell phone while driving

No

All cellphone ban

No

All cellphone use banned for novice drivers

Drivers under 18

Text messaging ban while driving

All drivers

Source: Governors Highway Safety Association


Rates methodology: EverQuote analyzed premiums reported by our users. Premiums are based on policies with liability of 100/300/50 ($100,000 bodily injury per person, $300,000 bodily injury per accident, $50,000 property damage) and uninsured motorist coverage of 100/300 ($100,000 per person, $300,000 per accident). We used premiums collected between Jan. 1, 2017, and Dec. 31, 2018. Your own rates will be different.

Updated March 6, 2019

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